Extremely Untitled

A Not So Modern Theme

vdjango:

Morningstar, 2008 - Paul Fryer

The Holy Trinity Church in Marlebone, Westminster, built specifically to celebrate the defeat of Napoleon, hasn’t been used as a place of worship since the 30’s, but that didn’t stop artist Paul Fryer from making a religious statement by hanging this terrifying statue of Satan inside. The piece, titled “Lucifer (Morningstar)” is a wax sculpture depicting the devil snared in a set of power lines. The statue is equal parts grotesque and beautiful, showing Lucifer as an oily, black creature with beautiful white wings (created from real feathers). Even creepier in the fact that it’s lit via the church’s stained glass windows, an ironic juxtaposition that won’t be lost on many." - Greg Newkirk

themainloop:

Steve Huston

themainloop:

Steve Huston

seydouxing:

Trivia: Til Schweiger, being born and raised in Germany, had always refused to put on a Nazi uniform for a film role. The only reason he agreed to for this film was because he got to kill Nazis.

(via getwellsoonnigga)

themainloop:

Via Painting Stuff To Look Like Stuff

edbar1952:

David Alfaro Siqueiros. 1896-1974

Applying the finishing touches to "The New Democracy" 1944

i am getting the chance to study with Steve Huston in January ..nice way to start the new year :)

artistandstudio:

Maria Kreyn
beautifulbizzzzarreart:

Jeremy Lipking
Carlos Gardel - Amargura

 

"Amargura" – Carlos Gardel

getwellsoonnigga:

🇺🇸

getwellsoonnigga:

🇺🇸

asian-hunter:

“In old days, Japanese tattooists worked at their own houses and ran business quietly. They didn’t put up a sign and list telephone numbers on the book. The practice of tattooing was forbidden in Japan (until the end of World War II). The customers used to find the tattoo shops by word of mouth.

asian-hunter:

“In old days, Japanese tattooists worked at their own houses and ran business quietly. They didn’t put up a sign and list telephone numbers on the book. The practice of tattooing was forbidden in Japan (until the end of World War II). The customers used to find the tattoo shops by word of mouth.